Thomas Jefferson's Monticello

Monticello, home of President Thomas Jefferson, was constructed between 1796 and 1809. Jefferson designed the building, now a National Historic Landmark. Materials Conservation was retained to design and implement an historically-appropriate method for restoring the iconic west portico columns to their original finish.

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Sukari Keetin
United States Supreme Court

The Supreme Court, designed by Gilbert Cass, was built between 1932 and 1935. The impressive classical building is constructed out of Imperial White Danby Vermont marble. The West Portico’s sixteen Corinthian columns support a heavily embellished pediment. The statuary in the tympanum was carved in situ by Robert I. Aiken, an artist Cass recommended. Over time, the building has been cleaned several times, but thick black gypsum crusts have still built up and its delicate sculptural elements have begun to disaggregate and deteriorate.

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Sukari Keetin
Steel House

Connecticut College’s Steel House is a survivor of the Modern “kit” architecture movement. Designed in 1933 by architect Howard T. Fisher, the one-story house with attached garage was furnished by General Houses, Inc., a pioneer of modern prefabricated housing. The structure is a two-bedroom one bath starter home, made of 14-gauge painted steel exterior wall panels connected through flanges with simple bolt connections. Its innovative design featured the ability to take apart and relocate the entire house.

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Sukari Keetin
Sterling Memorial Library

The Sterling Memorial Library, on Yale University’s New Haven, Connecticut campus was designed by James Gamble Rogers, and completed in 1930. Above the doors of the High Street entrance are the bas reliefs works of artist Lee Lawrie and sculptor René Paul Chambellan that bear two panels depicting the history of the written word, a central scholar figure, and ornately carved buttresses.

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Sukari Keetin